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Alcoholism

What is alcoholism?

Alcoholism, also known as alcohol dependence, is a disease that includes the following four symptoms:

  1. › Craving--A strong need, or urge, to drink.
  2. › Loss of control--Not being able to stop drinking once drinking has begun.
  3. › Physical dependence--Withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, shakiness, and anxiety after stopping drinking.
  4. › Tolerance--The need to drink greater amounts of alcohol to get "high."

Alcoholism is a disease. The craving that an alcoholic feels for alcohol can be as strong as the need for food or water. An alcoholic will continue to drink despite serious family, health, or legal problems.

Like many other diseases, alcoholism is chronic, meaning that it lasts a person's lifetime; it usually follows a predictable course; and it has symptoms. The risk for developing alcoholism is influenced both by a person's genes and by his or her lifestyle.

Alcoholism is only one type of an alcohol problem. Alcohol abuse can be just as harmful. A person can abuse alcohol without actually being an alcoholic--that is, he or she may drink too much and too often but still not be dependent on alcohol. Some of the problems linked to alcohol abuse include not being able to meet work, school, or family responsibilities; drunk driving arrests and car crashes; and drinking-related medical conditions. Under some circumstances, even social or moderate drinking is dangerous--for example, when driving, during pregnancy, or when taking certain medications.

Answering the following four questions can help you find out if you or a loved one has a drinking problem:
  1. › Have you ever felt you should cut down on your drinking?
  2. › Have people annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?
  3. › Have you ever felt bad or guilty about your drinking?
  4. › Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

One "yes" answer suggests a possible alcohol problem. More than one "yes" answer means it is highly likely that a problem exists. If you think that you or someone you know might have an alcohol problem, it is important to see a doctor or other health care provider right away. They can help you determine if a drinking problem exists and plan the best course of action.

Used with permission from information provided by the the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.


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